HOME | BULK DEALS | PRAYING MANTIS EGG CASE INSTRUCTIONS | RELEASE INSTRUCTIONS | CONTACT US | TERMS AND CONDITIONS | SHIPPING INFORMATION | this page is under construction | LADYBUG LIFE CYCLE | FACTS ABOUT LADYBUGS | LADYBUG ANATOMY | WHY LADYBUGS HAVE SPOTS | LADYBUG CLASSIFICATION / SPECIES / TYPES | WHAT DO LADYBUGS EAT? | HANDLING YOUR LADYBUGS

HIGH SIERRA LADYBUGS

RELEASE INSTRUCTIONS


Everybody has their favorite way of releasing ladybugs and I would think that there really is no one way that is more correct than any other. .The suggestions I am making come from my own observations over several years and hundreds of ladybug releases. Different circumstances require different methods so not all reccomendations will work in all situations, use your own best judgement and procede as you feel best.I think that it would be agreed upon that the release should be made in the evening, just before dark. Ladybugs will not fly in the dark, or at least most of them won't. On warm to hot nights I have found it best to cool the bugs off with about 30 minutes in the refrigerator. This really slows them down and makes controlling them a lot easier, but only for a few minutes. I have found it best to release the bugs over a period of about 2 weeks, this gives the bugs time to find their own territory and get settled in without being overcrowded. Average pest infestations require 1 to 2 bugs for every square foot of planted area, on an initial release I recomend 10 bugs per square foot. Some will die, some will fly away, others will just disapear and after several days the amount of ladybugs will have sized itself to the correct amount that your garden requires.If you still have a high rate of infestation, release more bugs, Do not release more than needed to keep the pests under control. The idea is not to completely eliminate the problem just get it under control and leave enough to keep the ladybugs eating. If you completely rid the garden of it's pests, the ladybugs will die off or leave. With a minimum amount of a food supply, the ladybugs will stick around and lay eggs for the remainder of the season. Ladybugs must have a supply of Aphids and access to plant pollen for them to lay eggs that are fertile, a lot of Aphids will result in a lot of eggs. I have found that some ladybugs will settle right into their new enviroment and will stay the whole season while others will be there one day and the next they are gone. I have found that there are some types of enviroments they prefer over others but one thing they seem to thrive on is access to a sunny location that doesn't get too hot that they can gather on and sun themselves. While you are waiting for the sun to go down, lightly water the release area, this will cool everything down and give the bugs water to drink. So, you wait until it is almost dark, get the bugs out of the refrigerator and open the container. Have another container handy to transfer them into, transfer about 1/3 of them and put the rest back in the refrigerator. If you want to be sure they won't fly off for a few days, have a 50/50 mix of seven up and water in a spraybottle and lightly mist the bugs. Take them to your planned release area and gently sprinkle them around the base of the plants thay you want protected, ladybugs love to climb so let them loose at the bottom and they will find where they like it best. Next morning, they may be hard to find but most of them should be there. When they are spread out it doesn't look like there are many bugs, but keep looking and you will eventually get your eyes tuned into seeing them. Now, leave them alone for a few days. Check on them in a few days and see how they are doing, they should have eliminated a lot of aphids or whatever the pest of the week is. Looking around, you should see two or three ladybugs every one to two square feet, maybe a few clusters of the pests with ladybugs eyeballing them for their next meal and an occassional solitary pest here and there. If you don't see any pests, there were too many ladybugs, if you don't see any pests or ladybugs, there were way too many ladybugs, if you see a lot of pests but no ladybugs there were not enough ladybugs or maybe too many pests. Release more as needed and repeat every few days until you have determined the correct balance between pest and ladybugs. Unreleased ladybugs from this time of year (June through September) can be kept in your refrigerator for up to 2 months. Refrigerators should be kept at temperatures between 40 to 48 degrees, never freeze the bugs. Humidity is also a factor and should be about 74%. Keep in mind that the longer the ladybug is refrigerated, the shorter it's life will be.